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Stanley Robotics

  • Robotics
  • 0 Case Studies
The Roboticized Valet

Jul 05

Our robots committed to biodiversity!

"The heyday of excessively large structures is behind us". On Wednesday the 4th of July 2018, the French government presented its Biodiversity Plan - itsmeasures to try and stem the decline of natural spaces and species. This decline has sped upmarkedly in recent years. Why are we talking about this kind of subject on the Stanley Robotics blog? The answer is simple: this plan includes a significant component called "zero net artificialisation of soils". When a natural surface is used to build a concrete building or parking lot, this plan will demand that the same natural space is recreated elsewhere.Needless to say, this will significantly increase the cost of these constructions. A year ago, the CEO of an airport told us "you can’t imagine how surface waterproofing has become unavoidable and critical and therefore how important your solution is". Waterproofing surfaces? Obviously, since we’re a company which mostly builds car-robots, we didn’t know anything about this!We have since discovered the problem of soil artificialisation and understood that it’s much more serious when the soil is transformed for industrial or residential projects (for example, when we use it for dirt roads, sports fields etc) because it has to be "waterproofed". The increase of waterproofed soils - ⅔ of artificialized areas in France - has serious consequences for nature: it increases vulnerability to floods and also has an impact on biodiversity because the waterproofed surface is considered "dead". Finally, succeeding a posteriori to reconvert a waterproofed soil into a natural one is very complicated and very expensive.To illustrate the speed of soil artificialisation in France, since 2006 France has lost an area of agriculture and natural spaces equivalent to the Seine-et-Marne region! (source: National Biodiversity Observatory). The French Minister of Ecological Transition, who haspledged to fight against urban sprawl, assures us that "the heyday of excessively large" structures is behind us". What are the consequences for airports?Passenger traffic has been growing for several years by around 10% per year and is likely - according to industry experts - to double in the next 15 years. This places a great burden on all airport infrastructures, particularly on car parks.For a long time, with airports needing to increase their parking capacity, they would keep tarring additional natural plots adjacent to their existing car parks. Societal pressure to preserve the environment and plans like the Biodiversity Plan by the French government now makes this almost impossible. Projects such as these are no longer acceptable, or just become too expensive. Our robots, committed to Biodiversity Stanley Robotics robots present an interesting solution. The projects we are developing today with airports consist of heavily densifying pre-existing surface parking lots (50% more cars on the same asphalt surface). By avoiding taking up more natural surfaces, our work serves biodiversity! Finally, today our robots are designed to roll over bitumen. We are aware however thatsome huge airport car parks consist of grass or gravel spaces; it wouldn’t occur to us to ask them to tar them to help densify their car parks. We will therefore likely develop a robot capable of rolling over such surfaces in the future.We must immediately spark a radical change in models to adapt to the increased movement of people. Our robots are already preserving nature, and this isn’t going to stop!   Stéphanne Evanno

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Oct 22

Welcome Interview - Erwan

OK, Let’s start by introducing yourself to our readers (Just about who you are, your career so far etc.)So, I started in the automotive sector. I have always had a fascination with cars, and I still have. I started with a Technician’s certificate in car maintenance, so I repaired vehicles in garages. I then did a sandwich course at an engineering school where I began working for Delphi, an automotive supplier. This is where I discovered purchasing. I started in supplier quality assurance where I was involved in improving the quality of parts that were provided by our suppliers, in the electronics department. Having built contacts with suppliers, I pivoted into purchasing. The whole business relationship was of great interest to me, including participating in the strategic aspect of supplier selection.

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Oct 22

Welcome Interview - Erwan

Erwan recently joined Stanley Robotics as a Procurement Manager and will be in charge of structuring purchasing and logistics, finding partners and work with them on improving competitiveness and performance.OK, Let’s start by introducing yourself to our readers (Just about who you are, your career so far etc.)So, I started in the automotive sector. I have always had a fascination with cars, and I still have. I started with a Technician’s certificate in car maintenance, so I repaired vehicles in garages. I then did a sandwich course at an engineering school where I began working for Delphi, an automotive supplier. This is where I discovered purchasing. I started in supplier quality assurance where I was involved in improving the quality of parts that were provided by our suppliers, in the electronics department. Having built contacts with suppliers, I pivoted into purchasing. The whole business relationship was of great interest to me, including participating in the strategic aspect of supplier selection.

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Oct 02

Welcome Interview - Stéphane

Stephane recently joined Stanley Robotics as an Automation Engineer. He’s in charge of programming PLCs for automated process and safety of the cabins.OK, Let’s start by introducing yourself to our readers (Just about who you are, your career so far etc.)I had a French Bachelor’s degree in Engineering Science, so I could say that I already knew that I was going to become an engineer before going to High School. I did everything I could to become one: so after my A-level, I studied Advanced Maths & Physics in preparation classes for competitive entrance examination to French Engineering schools, then I joined the ENSIL, an Engineering School in Limoges, where I graduated in Mechatronics. I had a specialization in Mechatronics because it was a field which, at the time, led to many career paths, in particular in big industrial companies that were developing innovative systems. I had a great passion for aeronautics from the beginning, and during my years of studies I was drawn to automation and robotics which pushed me to do internships in these areas.

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